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Confronting Violence: Improving Women’s Lives

The exhibition, from the National Library of Medicine, tells the story of nurses who changed the medical profession and dramatically improved services to victims of domestic violence in the late 20th century.

About the Exhibit

Banner image for Confronting Violence: Improving Women's Lives

"Activists and reformers in the United States have long recognized the harm of domestic violence and sought to improve the lives of women who were battered. During the late 20th century, nurses took up the call. With passion and persistence, they worked to reform a medical profession that largely dismissed or completely failed to acknowledge violence against women as a serious health issue. Beginning in the late 1970s, nurses were in the vanguard as they pushed the larger medical community to identify victims, adequately respond to their needs, and work towards the prevention of domestic violence. This is their story."
A traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine.  On view at the Shiffman Library, March 18 - April 22, 2017.

The Exhibit Panels

Confronting Violence: Improving Women's Lives Exhibition Panels
The six-banner traveling exhibition explores images, manuscripts and records that tell the stories of the nurses who witnessed the effects of domestic violence and campaigned for change.

Community Event

Confronting Violence Community Conversation Event


Event Participants and Breakout Session Descriptions

Mistress of Ceremonies

Larmender A. Davis, M.S.W, L.M.S.W., (PhD Candidate)

  • Larmender A. Davis is the Coordinator of Integrated Behavioral Health and Community Services at The Wellness Plan Medical Centers, a federally qualified health care clinic, located in Detroit, MI.  She is a current adjunct professor with Wayne State University School of Social Work. She is also an agency founder, incorporator, and Board Member of Serenity Services, a non-profit domestic/sexual violence agency.  As principal of Soul Fire, LLC, Davis provides event planning or organizational consulting to small businesses and organizations. She is Second Vice President of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Detroit Alumnae Chapter. Having over 23 years’ experience in non-profit management, Davis earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology and a Master’s degree in social work, both from Wayne State University. She is licensed with the State of Michigan as a Licensed Social Worker.  She is completing her dissertation to obtain her PhD is Organizational Psychology at Walden University. Born and raised in Detroit, Davis is married and has one daughter.
Breakout Session Descriptions

Defining Domestic Violence

Larmender A. Davis, M.S.W., L.M.S.W., (PhD Candidate), The Wellness Plan Medical Centers.           

  • During this interactive session, we will discuss the definition and dynamics of domestic violence, including the Power and Control Wheel, the cycle of abuse, and dispelling myths about domestic violence. Participants will increase their knowledge domestic violence, understand victims and survivors, in addition to how to support and advocate for victims and survivors.
  • Larmender A. Davis is the Coordinator of Integrated Behavioral Health and Community Services at The Wellness Plan Medical Centers, a federally qualified health care clinic, located in Detroit, MI.  She is a current adjunct professor with Wayne State University School of Social Work. She is also an agency founder, incorporator, and Board Member of Serenity Services, a non-profit domestic/sexual violence agency.

 

“Supporting Survivors of Sexual Assault – An Exploration of Rights and Options”

Amy Dowd, MSW, Wayne County Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners Program (WC SAFE).

  • This workshop will focus on the needs of sexual assault survivors in the immediate aftermath following a sexual assault. This workshop will review the medical, legal and social concerns that survivors of sexual assault commonly face and will explore best practice for practitioners and other helping processionals when supporting a survivor through the process of seeking help. A WCSAFE Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner will provide a detailed review of the medical forensic exam.
  • Amy Dowd is a licensed MSW and currently, the Director of Advocacy Services for Wayne County SAFE (Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner) Program in Detroit.  Amy has over 15 years’ experience as an advocate for both domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. In addition to her direct service and leadership experience, Amy has a passion for education and outreach.  Amy has collaborated with several local colleges and universities including University of Michigan, Wayne State University, Eastern Michigan University and Marygrove College in effort to increase awareness and student engagement on campus. Amy has helped to plan and execute events including Take Back the Night, Survivor Speak-Out, and Survivor Art Show. Amy has been invited as a guest lecturer with Eastern Michigan University and University of Michigan’s volunteer program lecturing on topics related to gender based violence, in addition to women and substance abuse issues.  Amy has been an advising member to several ground breaking projects in the city of Detroit, including the National Institute of Justice Rape Kit Action Research Project and the Wayne County Sexual Assault Kit Task Force. She is a trainer for the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards in the area of non-stranger sexual assault investigations and has presented both locally and nationally on issues related to sexual assault, trauma, and best practices.
  • Amy Dowd is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University where she obtained both a Bachelor’s of Science degree and a Master's degree in Social Work with concentrations in mental health and chemical dependency.  She has been a licensed practitioner in the State of Michigan for 5 years.

 

“6 Myths about the Legal System that Silence Survivors”

Monica Batsford, Wayne State University Law School and

Jamison Brewer, Supervising Attorney, Lakeshore Legal Aid.

  • An overview of the myths that survivors of intimate partner violence often hear that prevent them from seeking help through the legal system, and the truth about access to family law assistance and personal protection orders (PPO’s).
  • Monica Batsford is a second-year law student at Wayne State University Law School.  At the Free Legal Aid Clinic she provides legal services for low-income clients in family and elder law. Monica has been elected as Board Secretary of the clinic and looks forward to training more law students to continue helping those in need. 
  • Jamison Brewer is a Supervising Attorney with Lakeshore Legal Aid, and he provides supervision to Wayne State law students working at the Free Legal Aid Clinic.  Jamison’s previous legal aid work in Detroit includes representing survivors of intimate partner violence and low-income homeowners facing foreclosure.

 

Special Session: Rape Aggression Defense (RAD)

Sergeant Jaclyn Wilton, R.A.D. Instructor Trainer, Wayne State Police.

  • Discussion and overview of how rape aggression defense techniques can be utilized for self-dense.  “The mission of the R.A.D. Systems is to establish an accessible, constantly improving and internationally respected alliance of dedicated Instructors. These Instructors in turn, will provide educational opportunities for women, children, men and seniors to create a safer future for themselves. In doing this, we challenge society to evolve into an existence where violence is not an acceptable part of daily life.”         - R.A.D. Mission Statement

Exhibit Themes

Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives Exhibition Themes

1. Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives tells the story of nurses who changed the medical profession by dramatically improving healthcare services to victims of domestic violence in the late 20th century.

2. A long trajectory of reformers sought to end family violence and improve women’s lives, including mid-19th century temperance and women’s right advocates, and 1970s feminist activists.

3. Beginning in the late 1970s, nurses identified the urgent medical issues facing women who were battered. They were in the vanguard as they worked to reform the larger medical community to identify victims, adequately respond to their needs, and work towards the prevention of domestic violence.

4. Nurses advocated, educated, and organized nationally for professional reform. Nurses and their allies created and implemented some of the first hospital protocols for treating battered women. Hospitals across the country eventually adopted these guidelines, which continue to serve as models of effective medical intervention.

5. While these reforms were significant and helped to save and improve countless lives, the work of ending violence in American homes continues to this day. We can all confront violence and work to improve women’s lives. 

Credits

Confronting Violence, Improving Women’s Lives began traveling around the United States in October 2015. For more information, contact nlmtravelingexhibits@nlm.nih.gov or visit: www.nlm.nih.gov/confrontingviolence


The National Library of Medicine produced this exhibition. 

Special thanks to the members of the Vera P. Shiffman Medical Library Outreach Advisory Council Members and guest members of the planning committee Alexandra Sarkozy, Beth Applebaum, and Rachael Clark.

Guide to the exhibit developed by Rachael Clark, Librarian, Wayne State University.
 

Disclaimer

The information and links are being provided as a convenience and for informational purposes only. The WSULS is not responsible for the availability or content of these external sites.  Their inclusion does not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the WSULS and it bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality or content of the external sites.